ADAPTIVE WEB DESIGN BOOK

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Building an elegant, functional website requires more than just knowing how to code. In Adaptive Web Design, Second Edition, you'll learn how. In Adaptive Web Design, Second Edition, you'll learn how to use progress When you've mastered the tenets and concepts in this book, you will see the Web . Adaptive Web Design: Crafting Rich Experiences with Progr and millions of other books are available for site site. Adaptive Web Design: Crafting Rich Experiences with Progressive Enhancement Paperback – May 30, Learning Web Design: A Beginner's Guide to HTML, CSS.


Adaptive Web Design Book

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This isn't just another web design book. It's an essential and adaptive websites that will not only serve your users well, but provide them with. In this brief book, Aaron Gustafson chronicles the origins of progressive Adaptive Web Design not only provides the clearest, most beautiful. 7 Essential Books on Responsive Web Design You Do Not Want to Miss For sale on site (paperback): $ For sale on A Book Apart.

Design is an Enhancement Chapter 5: Interaction is an Enhancement Chapter 6: Crafting a Continuum Appendix A: Progressive Enhancement Checklist Appendix B: Tracey Croom Development Editor: Stephanie Troeth Copy Editor: Kim Wimpsett Proofer: Patricia Pane Compositor: Danielle Foster Indexer: James Minkin Cover Design: Veerle Pieters Interior Design: That was the way we built things, but it always felt weird.

So I read Eric's article and thought: I started to read everything I could, and I immediately understood that web standards was a way forward.

Adaptive Web Design: Crafting Rich Experiences with Progressive Enhancement, Second Edition

If you had an error in your code and something went wrong, the entire thing could fall apart. He recalls his time freelancing at Gartner, where there were separate style sheets for each browser, and the team used JavaScript to decide which sheet to serve.

It was so painful. Then, a lightbulb went on in my head — I thought, 'This web standards thing makes a lot of sense!

From there, by his own admission, Gustafson was like a sponge, absorbing anything and everything he could find about web standards. Writing about the topic was followed by speaking about it, and in Gustafson joined WaSP himself.

He spent his early days working on "some pretty cool stuff" , including collaborating with the team at Internet Explorer to improve the JavaScript interpreter and to adopt the W3C's Event Model. Quite soon Gustafson was invited to become a manager at WaSP. The mission, he says, to a degree, was over too.

There's still work to be done, but we're in a much better place than we were 10 or 15 years ago. The standards war might be won but Gustafson doesn't seem like a man ready to turn off his Mac and go fishing.

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Rather, he explains, there are still many risks to the web's apparent wellbeing. This idea of creating walled gardens which are 'of the web', but not the web itself.

They use web technologies and rely on the fundamentals of HTTP, but the resources they provide access to aren't addressable from the web. That scares me.

Having indicators about where you can find content is a huge part of the web's power. Another big fear for Gustafson is to do with equal access.

That leads us to have a very myopic view of what the 'mobile web' is, and what web access on a mobile device needs to be. To underline his point, he explains he's consulting with a store that's begun selling cheap tablets. There was stunned silence on the phone.

Adaptive Web Design author shares his accessibility quest

We're surrounded by high-end devices and get into the mindset that this is the mobile web. We miss the low-end devices with Android, a bad processor and a crappy screen.

This brings us to Gustafson's primary hunting ground: The experience is more of a continuum from a basic one that might just be text with links, right up to a fully interactive one. Gustafson's philosophy centres around giving different people — or more correctly, different devices — different experiences.

We liked the idea of a web experience that could adapt to the user. Those three things absolutely should be part of a page's progressive enhancement.

The lowest common denominator devices don't have media query support So, if you were to flip it the other way and practice responsive web design from a mobile-first perspective, that aligns perfectly with progressive enhancement.

For me, responsive is a technique that comes under the umbrella of progressive enhancement.

Gustafson is at pains to point out that building with progressive enhancement doesn't necessarily mean sites cost more to make. You start to realise how browsers work.Progressive Enhancement Checklist Appendix B: Former Yahoo! They use web technologies and rely on the fundamentals of HTTP, but the resources they provide access to aren't addressable from the web.

Therefore, providing a rich experience on news type is more popular than the responsive design. He recalls his time freelancing at Gartner, where there were separate style sheets for each browser, and the team used JavaScript to decide which sheet to serve.

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Gustafson is at pains to point out that building with progressive enhancement doesn't necessarily mean sites cost more to make. Therefore, providing a rich experience on news type is more popular than the responsive design. They advocated open source, consistency, accessibility and portability. Markup is an Enhancement Chapter 4: Beyond that, I'm pretty involved with the Open Device Lab.